Top 10 BCRC blog posts of 2015

This past year we published 68 blog posts that offered production tips, science-based perspectives on issues in the media, highlighted new beef, cattle and forage research projects and results, and announced other exciting initiatives. Of those, these were the top 10 most popular:

10. New resources added to BodyConditionScoring.ca help cow-calf producers increase profits

body_condition_yearround_profitability_beef_cattle_fact_sheetA new feed cost calculator was added to give producers the ability to compare the costs of increasing the body condition of thin cattle using different feed sources. Three fact sheets were also added, which explain reproductive issues with over- and under-conditioned cows, developing a winter feeding program for under-conditioned cows and how to maintain condition year-round for maximum profitability.

Follow the link to see the fact sheets and to calculate costs with the feed sources available on your own operation.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/new-resources-added-to-bodyconditionscoring-ca/

 

9. Celebrate beef industry’s continual environmental improvements on Earth Day

Click to enlargeCattle producers continue to make improvements that reduce the environmental impact of beef production. A study currently underway and funded by the BCRC is examining changes in the amount (and types) of feed, land and water needed to produce a kilogram of beef compared to three decades ago.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/defining-environmental-footprint-of-canadian-beef-production/

 

8. New video: What beef producers need to know about pain control and prevention

We know that procedures such as branding, castration, and dehorning are painful, but what are the incentives and practical options for mitigating pain in cattle?

Watch this short video to find out how pain control and prevention options now available for beef cattle can have production benefits and can make processing easier, safer, and more efficient.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/new-video-what-beef-producers-need-to-know-about-pain-control-and-prevention/

 

 7. Inaugural Canadian Beef industry Conference set for August 9-11, 2016

Canadian Beef Industry Conference - SaveTheDate2016Several of Canada’s beef industry organizations have come together to create a one-of-a kind conference with keynote speakers, educational presentations, interactive demonstrations, as well as fun and entertainment.

Read the press release to find out more!

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/canadian-beef-industry-conference-2016/

 

6. Consumer MisReports

Durbeef-consumer-reportsing the summer, Consumer Reports released a “Beef Report” that raised questions about the quality and safety of beef, and beef production’s contribution to antibiotic resistance. Some of the information in it was misleading or simply not true.

We tackled some of the claims made in that report.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/beef-is-safe-consumer-reports-misleading/

 

5.  Are ionophores a risk for antibiotic resistance?

Health Canada will phase out growth promotion claims for medically important antibiotics by December 2016.

This article explains why not including ionophores in the initiative is based on sound science.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/ionophores-risk-for-amr-bergen/

 

4. Announcing the Beef Researcher Mentorship Program 2015-2016 participants

ClaudiaThe Beef Researcher Mentorship program allows researchers who study cattle, beef, genetics, feed or forage production to gain a better understanding of the Canadian beef industry. This year four participants from across Canada where chosen and paired with both an industry and producer mentor.

Follow the link to meet this year’s participants and their mentors.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/beef-researcher-mentorship-program-2015/

 

3. New video: What beef producers need to know about antibiotic use and resistance

Click to play videoAntibiotic use and resistance was a popular topic in 2015. With so much news and information available, this short video was released to provide beef producers with the information they need to know.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/video-antimicrobial-use-and-resistance-in-beef-cattle-production/

 

2. These little piggies ate a quarter pounder a day

Retail beefConsumer concerns about the use of hormones in beef production are rising. For example, it has been questioned whether hormone implants in beef cattle cause young girls to reach puberty sooner.

This article explains the science and why there is no need to be concerned.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/these-little-piggies-ate-a-quarter-pounder-a-day-bergen/

 

1. Results of the Western Canadian Cow-Calf Survey: Production Benchmarks.

The Western Canadian Cow-Calf Survey was conducted over winter 2014-15. Our most popular blog post of the year break down the results and how these can be used as production benchmarks on your operation.

http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/western-canadian-cow-calf-survey-results/

Any requests for 2016?

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More on BeefResearch.ca

Remember there is more than just blog articles on BeefResearch.ca! Take a look at overviews and videos on all kinds of topics, or summaries of individual research activities. To raise your beef IQ, start by clicking one of these:

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Source: Latest from Beef Cattle Research Council