PED surfaces on second farm in Alberta

A 600 head farrow to finish hog operation in Alberta is at the centre of an investigation by Alberta Agriculture and Forestry after the discovery of a case of porcine epidemic diarrhea.

It is the second case in as many months in the province, after one was found on another operation.

Provincial officials have been working to determine the cause of the first case, however, they have yet to find one.

RELATED ARTICLES:

High traffic pig sites in Alberta test negative for PED

RRC PODCAST: What bio-security measures producers should review in wake of PED case in Alberta 

The province’s Chief Veterinarian says traffic coming to and from the second farm has been halted and enhanced bio-security from site has been implemented.

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) is a highly contagious, viral disease in pigs. PED causes severe diarrhea and death in suckling pigs and milder diarrhea in older pigs.

Officials are urging producers that any sudden onset of unusual diarrhea should be investigated immediately by a veterinarian.

Alberta Pork is urging producers to enhance biosecurity on-farm and in animal transportation.   Farmers are also being asked to submit all swine manifests, including farm-to-farm movements, in a timely manner.

It has no effect on humans and pork products remain safe to eat.

Alberta Pork says this incident has not caused any food safety concerns, and pork products remain safe for consumption.

This is the second case ever found in Alberta.

READ THE FULL STATEMENTS FROM ALBERTA’S CHIEF VETERINARIAN OFFICER AND ALBERTA PORK BELOW:

Feb 21, 2019
A second case of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) has been confirmed by Alberta Agriculture and Forestry.

The producer and the herd veterinarian are working closely with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Alberta Pork and their processor.

Pig traffic to and from the site has been stopped and enhanced biosecurity is being implemented. An investigation into the source of the virus has begun.

In Alberta, PED is a provincially reportable disease, which means that producers or veterinarians must notify the Office of the Chief Provincial Veterinarian (OCPV) of all suspected or confirmed cases. There is no human health risk with PED.

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) is a highly contagious, viral disease in pigs. PED causes severe diarrhea and death in suckling pigs and milder diarrhea in older pigs. Any sudden onset of unusual diarrhea should be investigated immediately by a veterinarian.

We do not expect any market access implications as a result of this finding.

If you suspect your pigs may be infected, contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the Office of Alberta’s Chief Provincial Veterinarian at 780-427-3448.

===

Second PED case discovered in Alberta

A 600-head farrow-to-finish hog operation in Alberta has contracted the porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) virus, a disease that causes diarrhea and vomiting in pigs. Alberta Pork is working closely with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry to fully investigate this outbreak and prevent the disease from spreading further.

This is the second-ever reported case of PED in Alberta. The first case was reported in January 2019. Since then, provincial stakeholders have been monitoring the situation to determine a source for that outbreak, but none has been found. At this time, it is uncertain whether the first and second reported cases of PED are linked in any way.

Strict biosecurity protocols are of utmost importance in limiting the impact of disease in agriculture. It is especially critical during this outbreak that producers consider enhancing biosecurity on-farm and in animal transportation. Producers are encouraged to submit all swine manifests, including farm-to-farm movements, in a timely manner.

Any place off-farm, such as an abattoir, should be considered as a potential source for bringing disease to your herd. Producers are reminded to review their farms’ biosecurity policies regularly and consult Alberta Pork or your herd veterinarian as required. Producers should also consult their herd veterinarians before making shipping decisions as a precaution if herd health issues are suspected.

PED affects pigs but poses no risk to human health. This incident has not caused any food safety concerns, and pork products remain safe for consumption. Alberta Pork will continue to communicate updates on this outbreak as new information is received. Read the official update from the Office of the Chief Provincial Veterinarian.